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4 Tin Fish Farm

Cheese Review: Innes Brick

During our trip to France this spring we took a whirlwind 24 hour trip to London to visit a dear friend we had not seen in years.  One of our first stops was Neal’s Yard Dairy.  The workers there were so friendly, kind, and helpful.  They kept cutting more and more cheese samples for us.  We began to feel greedy and rude and reined in our tasting, only to be urged on, well if you liked ____, you really need to try ____ and compare them.  I just wanted to cry that we were treated like royal guests, doing them an honour eating their cheeses.  It was magnificent.  I tried to keep notes on each cheese that we tried but it was difficult to keep up.  I can’t bring myself to do one huge post on all we tried so I’m going to drag it out/milk it/savor all the options, for as long as possible.  So for today, we’re going to talk about the Innes Brick. 

This is a an unpasteurized goat milk cheese.  As the name implies it is a brick shape and it has a geotrium rind.  My notes on it say “beautiful and delicious”.  I find in the United States a lot of goat cheeses are very goaty tasting, which I hate.  Innes Brick doesn't have that icky taste at all.  It was smooth, creamy and mild.  It is approximately 7 oz so it is a relatively small brick.  If you are using it for a cheese plate with other cheeses half of a brick would be sufficient, so then you can save the other half to nibble on yourself after all your guests leave.  According to their website, Innes Cheese is made by Stella Bennett since 1987.  The farm, Highfields  Farm Dairy in Staffordshire is now run by her son, Joe Bennett.  They milk about 220 does and have about 350 goats in their herd.  Their cheese can be found throughout the UK in a number of high-end cheese and gourmet food shops and a few restaurants.  Unfortunately, I cannot find a retail outlet that sells it in the United States, I presume because it is only ripened 3 weeks and uses raw milk.   This may be another cheese that I experiment with re-creating this summer.

I don’t know if it’s possible to get cheese drunk, but I think the four of us walked out of Neal’s Yard Dairy a little tipsy.

 Innes Bricks, back center, behind Innes Logs

 

http://www.innescheese.co.uk/index.html

http://www.nealsyarddairyshop.co.uk/

 

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Although it is absolutely irrelevant to the cheese, Stella Bennett is the widow of the truly great British blues musician, Duster Bennett who was killed in a road accident in 1976. Duster's, and Stella's story is told in the book "Jumping at Shadows" by Martin Celmins and it is an inspirational story both about his fantastic music and her extraordinary life after his sad passing.



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